What to Do with Your Script

The roles for a movie or theatrical play are given out and you get the lead role. There are two ways to seeing this scenario: 1 Be thankful because a lead role would give you more room for creativity, more exposure and greater chances of impressing directors and producers for a possible next project, or 2 Worry because of all the lines that you have to memorize and deliver. Needless to say, to land on a major role is what every actor or actress dreams of having; and with big roles come longer lines. So here are some tips which you may use to ease your way through that manuscript.

Memorize.

Of course, the first thing that you need to do is to know your lines. Memorize them and make sure that you are able to throw them with a partner on a conversational manner. Read the script over and over until you finally get the idea as to how the story goes. Studying the script repeatedly will make it easier for you to recall the story and eventually remember all the words.

Read between the lines.

The script says a lot about the role that you play as well as the movie as a whole. So more than memorizing your lines, it is also important that you get to know your character more through the information implied on the script. For instance, if the character you are playing comes out as a rude, old lady, you might be surprised to find that the flow of the story actually reveals the reasons why she ended up that way. Knowing your character through the script also helps you as an actor because it helps you figure out what emotions should be given more focus or how certain lines should be delivered. The more you get to understand the character that you play, the more that you get to internalize. As a result, the audience sees an actor in you but the character in you.

Improvise and be creative.

Reading your script ahead gives you time to improvise on your script and be creative. Especially on comical movies and plays, you may find it appropriate to add punch lines or phrases in between lines to make it funnier. For scenes that are heavier, you may get creative by inserting small gestures or expressions whenever fitting. Stand the character that you play, the more that you get to internalize. As a result, the audience sees an actor in you but the character in you.

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